AOC, Texas Lefties Can’t Tell the Difference Between a Valid Legal Residency Document and a Worthless Student ID Card

“I’ve watched all the dropouts, who make their own rules. One person conditioned to rule and control. The media sells it and you live the role. Mental wounds still screaming, driving me insane. I’m going off the rails on a crazy train.” – Ozzie Osbourne

As par for the course when it comes to leftists fact checking anything, they’ve failed miserably.

In a social media posting, the hard left-leaning @Public_Citizen is spotlighting supposedly big news from their ComIntern Fellow Travellers over at ProgressTexas.org regarding Texas issued concealed handgun licenses and Texas issued state university ID cards.

As seen in the tweet below, an unshaved, sloppy, middle-aged hayseed of a white guy is portrayed in the faux-gun license, while an attractive, well-kempt young Latina is portrayed on the generic University of Texas ID card.

No… no subliminal racist message here.

It’s not enough that there crypto-Communists who shot out this particular tweet can’t get their facts straight, Comrade Lexie from the People’s Republic of Da Bronx saw fit to retweet.

Don’t forget, this gal’s an elected federal legislator who’s a member of the following;

  • House Committee on Oversight and Reform
  • House Committee on Financial Services
  • House Subcommittee on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties
  • House Subcommittee on Environment
  • House Subcommittee on Consumer Protection and Financial Institutions
  • House Subcommittee on Investor Protection, Entrepreneurship and Capital Markets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In other words, while AOC is knee-deep in making laws that cover your savings account, your mortgage, your 401k, your investments, and maybe even more important, law that could send you to prison for thought crimes, she did absolutely zero research regarding this political message she just retweeted.

I will admit that on the surface, is sure seems as if Public Citizen and Progress Texas just may have a point. At first blanch it does seem somewhat ridiculous that a CHL qualifies as valid ID to satisfy the Texas Voter ID Law, but a state issued Texas university system ID card doesn’t.

But being the good research-doing right-wingers that we are, we don’t accept as whatever as Gospel just because someone posted that same whatever to the internet.

Let’s start scratching the surface…

So what exactly does it take to have a UT student ID issued? In actuality, not a whole helluva lot. Pretty much just have your tuition paid up-to-date, you’re golden.

Case in point: According to the Office of External Relations of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board;

Persons classified as residents for higher education purposes under Texas law may pay in-state tuition. Although the State of Texas does not have any programs specifically for undocumented students, some undocumented persons are among those who are eligible for in-state tuition under current residency statutes. The residency statutes for higher education purposes have evolved somewhat over the past 7 years.

In other words, if you’re from Portland, Maine or Portland, Oregon, as long as your tuition is paid, you qualify for a UT student ID card.

Better yet, you can be from Lucknow, India, or Shitouttaluck, Bolivia, as long as your tuition is paid, you qualify for a UT student ID card.

Even reaching the heights of absurdity, as long as your tuition is paid, even if you are in the United States illegally, you qualify for a UT student ID card.

However, to qualify for a Texas issued concealed handgun license, you have to at least be a legal Texas resident (and ostensibly, a US citizen).

As noted by Texas state law regarding Sec. 411.172. ELIGIBILITY of a state issued Concealed Handgun License. Just keep in mind that violating just one of these dozens upon dozens of criteria, you can be denied a CHL, but if you are disqualified of nearly every single one of these specifics (the single exception being at least 21-years-old), you can STILL receive a State of Texas issued UT student ID card;

(a) A person is eligible for a license to carry a handgun if the person:

(1) is a legal resident of this state for the six-month period preceding the date of application under this subchapter or is otherwise eligible for a license under Section 411.173(a);

(2) is at least 21 years of age;

(3) has not been convicted of a felony;

(4) is not charged with the commission of a Class A or Class B misdemeanor or equivalent offense, or of an offense under Section 42.01, Penal Code, or equivalent offense, or of a felony under an information or indictment;

(5) is not a fugitive from justice for a felony or a Class A or Class B misdemeanor or equivalent offense;

(6) is not a chemically dependent person;

(7) is not incapable of exercising sound judgment with respect to the proper use and storage of a handgun;

(8) has not, in the five years preceding the date of application, been convicted of a Class A or Class B misdemeanor or equivalent offense or of an offense under Section 42.01, Penal Code, or equivalent offense;

(9) is fully qualified under applicable federal and state law to purchase a handgun;

(10) has not been finally determined to be delinquent in making a child support payment administered or collected by the attorney general;

(11) has not been finally determined to be delinquent in the payment of a tax or other money collected by the comptroller, the tax collector of a political subdivision of the state, or any agency or subdivision of the state;

Heeeeeeere’s Alexandria!

(12) is not currently restricted under a court protective order or subject to a restraining order affecting the spousal relationship, other than a restraining order solely affecting property interests;

(13) has not, in the 10 years preceding the date of application, been adjudicated as having engaged in delinquent conduct violating a penal law of the grade of felony; and

(14) has not made any material misrepresentation, or failed to disclose any material fact, in an application submitted pursuant to Section 411.174.

(b) For the purposes of this section, an offense under the laws of this state, another state, or the United States is:

(1) except as provided by Subsection (b-1), a felony if the offense, at the time the offense is committed:

(A) is designated by a law of this state as a felony;

(B) contains all the elements of an offense designated by a law of this state as a felony; or

(C) is punishable by confinement for one year or more in a penitentiary; and

(2) a Class A misdemeanor if the offense is not a felony and confinement in a jail other than a state jail felony facility is affixed as a possible punishment.

(b-1) An offense is not considered a felony for purposes of Subsection (b) if, at the time of a person’s application for a license to carry a handgun, the offense:

(1) is not designated by a law of this state as a felony; and

(2) does not contain all the elements of any offense designated by a law of this state as a felony.

(c) An individual who has been convicted two times within the 10-year period preceding the date on which the person applies for a license of an offense of the grade of Class B misdemeanor or greater that involves the use of alcohol or a controlled substance as a statutory element of the offense is a chemically dependent person for purposes of this section and is not qualified to receive a license under this subchapter. This subsection does not preclude the disqualification of an individual for being a chemically dependent person if other evidence exists to show that the person is a chemically dependent person.

(d) For purposes of Subsection (a)(7), a person is incapable of exercising sound judgment with respect to the proper use and storage of a handgun if the person:

(1) has been diagnosed by a licensed physician as suffering from a psychiatric disorder or condition that causes or is likely to cause substantial impairment in judgment, mood, perception, impulse control, or intellectual ability;

(2) suffers from a psychiatric disorder or condition described by Subdivision (1) that:

(A) is in remission but is reasonably likely to redevelop at a future time; or

(B) requires continuous medical treatment to avoid redevelopment;

(3) has been diagnosed by a licensed physician, determined by a review board or similar authority, or declared by a court to be incompetent to manage the person’s own affairs; or

(4) has entered in a criminal proceeding a plea of not guilty by reason of insanity.

(e) The following constitutes evidence that a person has a psychiatric disorder or condition described by Subsection (d)(1):

(1) involuntary psychiatric hospitalization;

(2) psychiatric hospitalization;

(3) inpatient or residential substance abuse treatment in the preceding five-year period;

(4) diagnosis in the preceding five-year period by a licensed physician that the person is dependent on alcohol, a controlled substance, or a similar substance; or

(5) diagnosis at any time by a licensed physician that the person suffers or has suffered from a psychiatric disorder or condition consisting of or relating to:

(A) schizophrenia or delusional disorder;

(B) bipolar disorder;

(C) chronic dementia, whether caused by illness, brain defect, or brain injury;

(D) dissociative identity disorder;

(E) intermittent explosive disorder; or

(F) antisocial personality disorder.