British war dog rips throat out of offending jihadist, saves lives of six SAS troops

Adversaries of the British Army’s SAS (Special Air Service) find death awaiting them in the most creative ways.

Quite possibly, these special operators may consider dispatching their enemies with the standard bullets, bayonets, and bombs to be somewhat passé.

After all, it was just a few short weeks ago that the British MoD (Ministry of Defence) decided to make public that an SAS sergeant stationed in Afghanistan killed six Taliban, three with his pistol, then the remainder with a claw hammer.

Now the word on the street is that an SAS war dog single-pawedly thwarted a jihadi ambush in Syria.

While the ISIS Islamists once controlled nearly half of Syria, the terrorist organization is now reduced to holding a smattering of villages in the nation’s north and east.

It was during a six-man SAS sweep of a nondescript village in the north of Syria that a yet to be publicly identified Belgian Malinois became a one-dog army.

The Belgian Malinois is closely related to the German Shepard. Both breeds are favored by the military for their fierce loyalty to their handlers as well as their savage ferocity in battle.

As reported by London’s The Daily Mail;

They had just entered a small village in a convoy of armoured vehicles when they got out to continue the recce on foot.

But soon after they left the safety of the convoy, they were attacked on all sides by waiting jihadis in what was described as a ‘360 degree ambush’.

The SAS men returned fire but the jihadis began closing in and tried to outflank them.

The animal was said to have leapt to the defence of the struggling British soldiers, tearing the throat of on gunman who was firing at the patrol.

It then turned on two other jihadis, leaving them seriously injured before the other six ambushers all fled.



Furthermore, the Daily Mail quoted an unnamed source (via Britain’s the Daily Star);

‘The initiative was with the terrorists and the only hope for the British was to try and make a run for it.

‘The handler removed the dog’s muzzle and directed him into a building from where they were coming under fire.

‘They could hear screaming and shouting before the firing from the house stopped.

‘When the team entered the building they saw the dog standing over a dead gunman.

‘His throat had been torn out and he had bled to death,’ the source continued, ‘There was also a lump of human flesh in one corner and a series of blood trails leading out of the back of the building.

‘The dog was virtually uninjured. The SAS were able to consolidate their defensive position and eventually break away from the battle without taking any casualties.’

The SAS commander in charge of the patrol credited the dog with directly saving the lives of all six of the men.