Communist Chinese Army Threaten Pro-American, Pro-Freedom Hong Kong

With the 1984 signing of the Sino-British Joint Declaration, it was agreed upon that the former British Dependent Territory consisting of Hong Kong Island, Kowloon and the New Territories, that the newly designated Hong Kong Special Administrative Region would retain not only Capitalism, but also the rights and responsibilities of civil and criminal law accorded to the people of Hong Kong during British rule, and that would remain so for the next 50 years.

Nonetheless, the Communist government in Beijing has made moves to negate the treaty by attempting to force their will over the Hong Kongers in regards to extradition to mainland China.

Obviously, the people of Hong Kong refuse to take lightly the Communists violating the rights of the same people that the Chinese agreed to respect not that long ago.

But in true Communist fashion, Beijing is massing troops on the Hong Kong border.

Perhaps understanding that the people of Hong Kong are a bit more sophisticated than the mainlander Chinese, who have been under the thumb of Communist oppression for well over the past half century, the PLA (Communist China’s People’s Liberation Army) has released quite a slick recruiting-style video complete with troops firing missiles from land, sea and air.

And for a bit more up-close-and-personal threat, ChiCom troops were also filmed firing large caliber sniper rifles and heavy machine guns.

One PLA soldier is heard making a non-too veiled threat aimed directly at the Honk Kong protesters;

While the people of Hong Kong have been marching and protesting the Communists attempted strong-arming them, both the US and old British colonial flags have been conspicuous.

Explaining why so many American flags are being seen during the marches was covered by reporter Nile Bowie of the Hong Kong-based Asia Times;

When black-clad protesters gathered at Hong Kong’s central Chater Garden for a mass rally on July 28, an unlikely tune rang through the air: a rendition of the United States’ national anthem performed by a megaphone-carrying activist in black sunglasses and a face mask.

As activists waved American flags and appropriated “The Star-Spangled Banner” as a protest song, a China Daily editorial published that day reiterated Beijing’s verdict on a protest movement that has brought parts of the semi-autonomous city to a standstill since demonstrations began in June.

“Judging from the preparation, targeting strategies, riot tactics and abundance of supplies, it takes naivety akin to simplemindedness to truly believe these activities are not being carefully orchestrated,” the state-run newspaper’s editorial said.

When black-clad protesters gathered at Hong Kong’s central Chater Garden for a mass rally on July 28, an unlikely tune rang through the air: a rendition of the United States’ national anthem performed by a megaphone-carrying activist in black sunglasses and a face mask.

As activists waved American flags and appropriated “The Star-Spangled Banner” as a protest song, a China Daily editorial published that day reiterated Beijing’s verdict on a protest movement that has brought parts of the semi-autonomous city to a standstill since demonstrations began in June.

“Judging from the preparation, targeting strategies, riot tactics and abundance of supplies, it takes naivety akin to simplemindedness to truly believe these activities are not being carefully orchestrated,” the state-run newspaper’s editorial said.

When asked whether his activism was prompted or directed by a foreign government, the protester replied: “I’m just expressing myself, I’m not paid by anyone. The Chinese government wants to attribute [protests] to foreigners, not to Hong Kong people.”

Beijing, for one, sees things differently. Last week, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying accused unnamed US officials of stoking violent chaos in Hong Kong: “We can see that US officials are even behind such incidents. So, can the officials tell the world what role did they play and what are their aims?” she asked during a regular press briefing.

“We advise the US to withdraw their black hands,” Hua remarked, without identifying the supposed officials involved or elaborating on their alleged interference.