Foundress of Women’s March Claims She was Dismissed for Being Jewish

As the old saying goes, if you lay with dogs, don’t be surprised if you come down with fleas.

That particular bit of wisdom very well could be a reference directed to Vanessa Wruble, co-foundress of the 2017 Women’s March, long since nicknamed “The Pussyhat March”.

As reported by The New York Times, Vanessa Wruble, formerly with the Women’s March organization, is now claiming that the reason she was dumped from the gyno-group is due to her Jewish heritage.

Never gonna happen… check.

After the shock and awe of Donald Trump defeating Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election, the stunned tears quickly became tears of rage.

It was then that Wruble felt the need “to try to help repair the world”, especially in light of “her Jewish heritage”. Well, that’s the picture The Times paints.

When the 2017 “Pussyhat March” was still in the planning stages, Wruble saddled-up with “Tamika Mallory, a black gun control activist, and Carmen Perez, a Latina criminal justice reform activist.”

It was at the initial meeting between the three that Mallory and Perez told Wruble “that Jews needed to confront their own role in racism.”

Also reported by The Times;

Ms. Wruble was pushed out of the organization shortly after the march, and she now asserts that her Jewish identity played a role. She went on to help found an organization called March On, which supports local women activists.

The rift is now so dire that there will be two marches on the same day next month on the streets of New York: one led by the Women’s March group, which is billed as being led by women of color, and another by a group affiliated with March On that is stressing its denunciation of anti-Semitism.

 

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A million strong. #womensmarch

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Ms. Mallory, meanwhile, who is now co-president of the Women’s March group, has been criticized for attending an event by Louis Farrakhan, the leader of the Nation of Islam who has been widely reviled for making anti-Semitic remarks. Ms. Mallory has called Mr. Farrakhan “the GOAT,” or “greatest of all time,” on social media.

The accusations of anti-Semitism, which were outlined in an article this month in Tablet, an online Jewish magazine, have prompted some women to reconsider their support for the group.

Some Jewish women have announced on social media that they will not attend the mass protest in Washington on Jan. 19 being organized by the Women’s March group. Last month, Teresa Shook, a white woman from Hawaii who created the first Facebook page proposing a march, called for the group’s leaders, who include Ms. Mallory and Ms. Perez, to step down.