Tag Archives: Sanitation

United Nations celebrates ‘World Toilet Day’

The Middle Eastern version of flushing your toilet.
The Third World version of flushing the toilet.

Are you one of the many Democrats and RINOs offended by President Trump describing certain Third World shitholes as…well, shitholes?

If so, you may take pleasure in knowing you aren’t alone. The United Nations is on your side.

Kinda. Sorta. OK, OK, I’ll admit it. The UN’s recent shindig has more in common with Trump’s rather crude, but honest, descriptive term than with the crew at MSNBC, CNN and the BBC clutching their collective pearls.

As Michael Filozof over at The American Thinker notes, the UN recently celebrated World Toilet Day.

No… really, they did.

In all honesty, the title of this particular world-wide day of celebration had me somewhat befuddled. I’m not really sure if the UN was simply singing the praises of Delta, Kohler, American Standard, etc, or indirectly agreeing with Trump’s hypothesis.



As Filozof correctly noted, the UN themselves cite the following statistics on the state of agujeros de caca around the world;

  • Around 60% of the global population – 4.5 billion people – either have no toilet at home or one that doesn’t safely manage excreta.
  • 862 million people worldwide still practise open defecation.
  • 1.8 billion people use an unimproved source of drinking water with no protection against contamination from faeces.
  • Globally, 80% of the wastewater generated by society flows back into the ecosystem without being treated or reused.
  • Only 39% of the global population (2.9 billion people) use a safely-managed sanitation service, that is, excreta safely disposed of in situ or treated off-site.
  • Combined with safe water and good hygiene, improved sanitation could prevent around 842,000 deaths each year

In other words, most of the nations on this planet really do qualify as shitholes.

Perhaps best illustrating just how certain nations really are shitholes, Sanjay Wijesekera, the Chief of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene and Associate Director of Programmes at UNICEF recently penned an article for the reliably leftie Huffington Post, in which Herr Direktor relates the saga of Yvonne, a woman who lives with 14 family members in the bacterially questionable city of Maputo, Mozambique.

As the bureaucrat wrote;

She describes her toilet as ‘bad’. Her pit latrine has filled up and costs 600 Meticais ($10) to be emptied. The latrine has a broken cement lid and lacks privacy, a source of embarrassment when neighbors walk by.

Hmmm… isn’t “pit latrine” just a polite way of saying shithole?

cropped-haiti2

‘In wine there is wisdom, in beer there is freedom, in water there is bacteria’ ~ Benjamin Franklin

More than just water and chlorine in the pool. (Twitter)
More than just water and chlorine in the pool. (Twitter)

We were warned in the 1975 blockbuster “Jaws” not to go into the water. But with a recent study released from Canada’s University of Alberta at Edmonton, that admonition very well could pertain to public swimming pools.

And what do you make of that peculiar extra-strong smell of chlorine at some public pools? Do you feel safer because you assume that some Good Samaritan dumped a little extra of the liquid element into the water? Guess again.

As reported by the good folks at Britain’s The Guardian, the standard large-sized public swimming pool contains roughly 20 gallons of human urine.

As reported;

It is an antisocial act that normally goes under the radar, but many swimmers have long suspected the truth: people are peeing in the pool.

Now scientists have been able to confirm the full extent of offending for the first time, after developing a test designed to estimate how much urine has been covertly added to a large volume of water. Regular swimmers with a keen sense of hygiene may wish to stop reading now.

The test works by measuring the concentration of an artificial sweetener, acesulfame potassium (ACE), that is commonly found in processed food and passes through the body unaltered.

After tracking the levels of the sweetener in two public pools in Canada over a three-week period they calculated that swimmers had released 75 litres [20 gallons] of urine – enough to fill a medium-sized dustbin – into a large pool (about 830,000 litres [220,000 gallons], one-third the size of an Olympic pool) and 30 litres into a second pool, around half the size of the first.

As if that wasn’t gross enough, America’s taxpayer subsidized National Public Radio (NPR) informs the world that the extra-strong chlorine smell wafting from some pools isn’t what it seems;

You know that sharp odor of chlorine from the swimming pool you can recall from earliest childhood? It turns out it’s not just chlorine, but a potent brew of chemicals that form when chlorine meets sweat, body oils, and urine.

The same report from NPR also cites, “In a residential pool (20-by-40-foot, five-feet deep), that would translate to about two gallons of pee.”